Registration

Register for Mehlville@Home

Registration for Mehlville@Home for the fall semester of 2020 is now closed.

 

Mehlville@Home 2020-2021 Middle School Course Guide

View the Mehlville@Home 2020-2021 Middle School Course Guide.

English Language Arts 

6th Grade English Language Arts Block (M0600) 
The student in 6th Grade Language Arts will develop writing, speaking, and reading skills. The student will write on a regular basis, with an emphasis on fluency, and will develop academic practices and strategies, such as collegial discussion and evaluating text. He or she will develop comprehension and fluent reading strategies with literary and non-fiction texts and will respond to literature and other texts in class discussion, peer groups, and through writing as well as informal presentations. 

7th Grade English Language Arts Block (M0700) 
The student in 7th Grade Language Arts will develop writing, speaking, and reading skills. The student will write on a regular basis, with an emphasis on fluency and analysis, and will develop strong academic practices and strategies, such as collegial discussion and evaluating text. The student will develop comprehension and reading strategies with both literary and non-fiction texts. The student will respond to literature and other texts in class discussion, peer groups, and through writing as well as informal and formal presentations.

8th Grade English Language Arts Block (M0800) 
The student in 8th Grade Language Arts will develop writing, speaking, and reading skills to prepare them for success in high school. The student will write on a regular basis, with an emphasis on responding to peers and to texts, and they will develop strong academic practices and strategies, including analyzing texts, citing sources, and editing their work, as well as discussion, presentation, and collaboration. The student will develop strong analytical and reading strategies with both literary and non-fiction texts. The student will respond to literature and other texts in class discussion, peer groups, and through writing as well as informal and formal presentations.

Mathematics

Math 6 (M2600) 
Math 6 is designed so that the student will become an active problem solver and connect mathematical processes and reasoning in everyday life. The student will gain an understanding of computation, geometry, and algebra through hands-on activities. The student will explore numeration, measurements, patterns, and variables using the inquiry method. The focus will be on active learning practices using problem-solving skills.

Math 6 Advanced (M2610) 
This course is designed to challenge students while developing algebraic concepts and relating them to other content areas and everyday experiences. Students will be engaged in mathematical activities with a focus on developing algebraic thinking. 

Math 7 (M2700) 
This course is a developmental approach to Algebra showing students how algebraic concepts relate to other content areas and everyday experiences. Students will engage in mathematical activities to learn number operations, proportional reasoning, geometry, probability and data analysis, with a focus on developing algebraic thinking. 

Math 7 Advanced (M2710) 
This course is designed to challenge students while developing algebraic concepts and relating them to other content areas and everyday experiences. Students will be engaged in mathematical activities to learn number operations, proportional reasoning, geometry and probability and statistics, with a focus on developing algebraic thinking in clear algebraic language. 

Math 8 (M2800) 
This course continues the developmental approach to Algebra, begun in Math 7, showing the student how algebraic concepts relate to other content areas and the student's everyday experiences. This is a program in which the student learns to state everyday problems in clear algebraic language and to solve them using algebraic procedures. The student learns basic algebraic notation, terminology, and concepts that lead to solving linear equations and quadratic equations. The student will learn to generalize, think spatially, and reason statistically. 


Algebra I (2810)
Algebra I is a challenging approach to algebra, in which students learn to state everyday problems in clear algebraic language and to solve them by algebraic procedures. Students may earn advanced-standing credit by successfully completing high-school level courses prior to entering the ninth grade. Advanced-standing credit may count toward meeting all graduation requirements, including state minimum requirements. 


Science

Science 6 - Life Science (M3600)  
The 6th grade life science course will build upon students’ science understanding from earlier grades in five main topics including structure, function, and information processing; growth, development, and reproduction of organisms; matter and energy in organisms and ecosystems; interdependent relationships in ecosystems; and natural selection and adaptations. The performance expectations in middle school blend core ideas with scientific and engineering practices and crosscutting concepts to support students in developing usable knowledge across the science disciplines. 

Science 7 - Earth Science (M3700) 
The earth science course develops understanding of a wide range of topics that build from elementary school into more advanced content. There are six topics addressed, and they are space systems, history of Earth, Earth’s interior systems, Earth’s surface systems, weather and climate, and human impacts. There is a great emphasis on systems and societally relevant concepts such as resources, hazards, and environmental impacts in this course. 

Science 8 - Physical Science (M3800) 
The middle school physical science course will continue to develop understanding of four ideas in the physical science including matter, chemical reactions, forces and interactions, and waves with the transfer and conservation of energy embedded in each of the four areas. The performance expectations in physical science blend the core ideas with scientific and engineering practices and crosscutting concepts to support students in developing usable knowledge to explain real world phenomena in the physical, biological, and earth and space sciences. 

Social Studies

World Geography and Cultures - 6th Grade (M1600) 
This course is designed to expose students to the geography, history, cultures, and regions of the world. Students will begin their study with the Five Themes of Geography and will apply those themes to a variety of world cultures. The students will explore the relationships among economics, governments, technological achievements, social structures and religions. 

World Civilizations - 7th Grade (M1700)
The World Civilizations’ curriculum will concentrate on the history of various civilizations. The study of these civilizations will be covered through the examination of the history, government, geography, economics, and social/cultural aspects of each area. Tools of inquiry (e.g. surveys, statistics, maps and documents), research skills and methods will be emphasized. Connections to the present world and relationships to currents events will be discussed and explored. 

American History - 8th Grade (M1800)
The eighth grade Social Studies curriculum involves the study of United States history from the Revolutionary War through Post-Civil War/Reconstruction. Also included is the study of geography, civics/government and economics. Students will learn their rights and responsibilities as citizens of the United States as developed in the U.S. Constitution and how others have used them to shape the development of our country. Learning will take place through a variety of instructional techniques, technology and multi-intelligence approaches. 

Health

Health - 6th Grade (M8663) 
The sixth grade health curriculum is designed to continue educating the student in the areas of life management skills, community service, body/social systems, nutrition, substance abuse, safety/prevention of injury, disease control and prevention and HIV/AIDS. 

Health - 7th Grade (M8672) 
The seventh grade health curriculum is designed to stress knowledge and skills in the following areas: functions and interrelationships of systems, health maintenance and enhancement, risk assessment and reduction, and HIV/AIDS. 

Health - 8th Grade (M8682)
The eighth grade health curriculum is designed to stress knowledge and skills in the following areas: body/social systems, personal/family health, nutrition principles and practices, consumer health, life management skills, substance abuse, safety/prevention of injury, disease control and prevention (including STDs and HIV/AIDS) and environmental health. 

Physical Education

Physical Education - 6th Grade (M8560T1) 
The sixth grade physical education curriculum will provide the student with a variety of lead-up games related to team sports and tournament play. 

Physical Education - 7th Grade (M8572) 
The seventh grade physical education curriculum will provide the student with continued skill instruction related to individual, dual, and team sport activities. 

Physical Education - 8th Grade (M8572) 
The eighth grade physical education curriculum will provide the student with advanced skill instruction related to individual, dual, and team sport activities. The student will be introduced to advanced games, strategies and techniques. 

Electives

Discover Coding I
Discover Computer Coding I covers foundational concepts and skills of computer science. Students will learn core computing concepts through interactive project-based coding practices using drag-to-text coding to help students gain familiarity with Python syntax and commands. Discover Computer Coding I is a great place for students to begin their coding journey.

Discover Coding II
Discover Computer Coding II covers foundational concepts and skills of computer science. You will learn computer programs to express yourself and solve problems. Using Edhesive, we will build many different types of programs. Discover Computer Coding II is a great place for students to continue their coding journey. 

Music Journeys
This course is designed for students to develop fundamental musicianship, including but not limited to music history, music theory, and music appreciation.

Visual Arts
Visual Arts provides the opportunity for students to learn about art and the art world through engaging in the course as a practicing artist. Learners in this course will explore and experiment with a variety of materials and techniques to increase creative expression in personal work.  Artists will create original art through the practice of artistic behaviors that include skill development, problem-solving, risk-taking and reflection.

French I (8th Grade) M6310
The student learns to communicate in basic spoken and written French using high-frequency vocabulary in everyday situations. Each lesson topic features an interest of French-speaking young people in the world today. The student experiences French culture through videos, role-playing and music. 

German I (8th Grade) H6110
The German I course will introduce the student to basic vocabulary and grammar, rudimentary communication with learned phrases and simple questions and answers in German. The student will acquire an understanding of the customs and traditions of German-speaking countries. 

Spanish I (8th Grade) M6210
Spanish I is an introduction to the Spanish language. The student develops the skills of understanding, speaking, reading and writing in Spanish, learning basic vocabulary and the fundamental structure of grammar. The student engages in a variety of activities which introduce them to the culture and customs of many Spanish-speaking countries. The diversity of Hispanic culture is also experienced through videos and music. Heavy emphasis is placed on oral communication. 


Mehlville@Home 2020-2021 High School Course Guide

View the Mehlville@Home 2020-2021 High School Course Guide.

English Language Arts

English I: American Literature and Composition – H0010
English I explores the various genres and themes of American Literature, emphasizing reading comprehension and analysis skills. The student will investigate the relationship between society and the individual, and how this relates to the American identity. The student will write regularly while developing argumentative, research and narrative skills. Participation in informal and formal class discussion will be expected daily.
Prerequisite: None
Credit: 1 Unit – Two Semesters (English Language Arts)

English II: World Literature and Composition – H0040
English II: World Literature and Composition explores the various genres of world literature, emphasizing historical perspectives and cultural themes through close reading and analysis. The student will write regularly while developing argumentative, research, and rhetorical skills. Participation in informal and formal class discussion will be expected.
Prerequisite: English I
Credit: 1 Unit – Two Semesters (English Language Arts)

English III: English Literature and Composition – H0070
English III: English Literature and Composition explores the various genres of English Literature emphasizing close reading and analysis. The student will write regularly while developing higher-level argumentative, research, and rhetorical skills. Participation in informal and formal class discussion will be expected daily.
Prerequisite: English  II
Credit: 1 Unit – Two Semesters (English Language Arts)

College Preparatory Literature – H0111
This course is designed to challenge the college-bound student who is striving to improve reading and analytical skills. The course includes the following genres of literature: novel, short story, poetry, drama and film.
Prerequisite: English III
Credit: ½ Unit – One Semester (English Language Arts)

College Preparatory Writing – H0112
This senior course is designed to challenge the college-bound student who is striving to achieve higher-level composition and language skills. The course includes practice in the writing process resulting in the following polished essays: narrative, evaluative, research, analytical, argumentative, compare/contrast. The course also includes vocabulary development and intensive grammar review focusing on ACT requirements.
Prerequisite: English III
Credit: ½ Unit – One Semester (English Language Arts)

Advanced Placement English Literature and Composition - H0110W
This course is intended to prepare you for the AP English Literature and Composition examination administered by the College Board each spring. All students will engage in the careful reading and critical analysis of imaginative literature. Through the close reading of selected texts, you will deepen your understanding of the ways writers use language to provide both meaning and pleasure for their readers. As a survey of Western and English Literature, the course will include not only a study of major literary works of each historical period, but also a study of the economic, moral, and social environment that produced the literature. Critical analysis of the structure and genre of literature corresponds to an approach to writing about literary works, including writing to understand, to explain, and to evaluate. Writing genres include expository, analytical, and argumentative essays.
Prerequisite: Prerequisite: Students who are successful in AP Literature must be able to read and comprehend college-level texts and apply the conventions of Standard Written English in their writing. Successful completion of English II is required.
Credit: 1 Unit – One Year (English Language Arts)
Weighted 1.0

Mathematics

Pre-Algebra  H2000
This course gives the student the opportunity to strengthen skills using the basic operations of addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division of whole numbers, decimals, fractions, and real numbers. Students will build their knowledge of measurement, percent, operations with integers, and graphing. A focus on developing problem-solving skills and number sense to build a foundation for Algebra I.
Prerequisite: None
Credit: 1 Unit – Two Semesters (Math)

Algebra I – H2100
This course will develop logical mathematical thought through the use of variables, algebraic properties and their connection to real world situations. The course will primarily explore solving and graphing equations and inequalities of functions. Algebra skills will be developed to support these investigations. Patterns, probabilities, statistics, number sense and relationships to real world situations will also be incorporated throughout the course. Additional perspectives and activities will be investigated to gain understanding of the topics in Algebra I. Before taking the course the student should have mastered integer operations, rational number operations, order of operations and solving one-step and two-step equations on one variable. 
Prerequisite: None
Credit: 1 Unit – Two Semesters (Math)

Algebra II – H2295
In this course, the Algebra I concepts are extended and enriched. Topics studied include graphing, analyzing and interpreting functions including polynomial, rational, and exponential functions; systems of linear equations and inequalities; exponents, matrices and radicals. Computer software may be used when appropriate to enhance instruction. Calculators will be used when appropriate.

Prerequisite: Algebra I 
Credit: 1 Unit – Two Semesters (Math)

Geometry – H2195
The Geometry student will think critically to analyze situations involving geometric figures.  Analyzing the situations will require perseverance in order to discover these geometric relationships and apply logical reasoning to draw valid conclusions.  The student will evaluate the reasonableness of their findings and produce logical arguments to support their conclusion. Calculators will be used when appropriate.
Prerequisite: Algebra I
Credit: 1 Unit – Two Semesters (Math)

College Prep Mathematics – H2382
This algebra course is designed as a bridge between Algebra II/Geometry and College Algebra. It is for the student who will continue to College Algebra or is college-bound. It includes new topics and applications of the Algebra II course. Topics include functions, inverses, matrices, trigonometry, quadratics, radicals and rational expressions, exponents, and logarithms.  Calculators will be used when appropriate. This course is a developmental college credit course through St. Louis Community College. The student who earns a grade of "C" or higher in this course will be eligible to earn 3 hours of credit for MTH 140 at St. Louis Community College, allowing him/her to move directly into PreCalc Algebra (Formerly College Algebra). The student taking this course will not receive any additional increase to their GPA for this course.
Prerequisite: Algebra II and Geometry
Credit: 1 Unit – Two Semesters (Math)

Advanced Placement Statistics – H2365W
The AP Statistics course is an excellent option for any student who has successfully completed Algebra II, regardless of the student’s intended college major. This course is not a Calculus-based course. The purpose of AP Statistics is to introduce students to the major concepts and tools for collecting, analyzing, and drawing conclusions from data. Students may choose to take the AP Exam at the end of the course.
Prerequisite: Students who are successful in AP Statistics must be strong, independent readers and organized writers. Students must be motivated and able to complete college-level course work. Students must have in-depth understanding of Algebra II content including Radical Expressions, Linear Functions, and Logarithmic functions.
Credit: 1 Unit – Two Semesters (Math)
Weighted 1.0

Science

Earth/Environmental Science – H3192
This course provides an introduction to the study of Earth's place in the Universe, Earth Systems, and the impact of Human activity on the Earth. The student studies and measures the interactions of matter, energy, and relationships in an ecosystem, the history of the earth and its systems, weather and climate, and human sustainability. Emphasis is placed on human interactions with the environment and the earth's systems.
Prerequisite: None
Credit: 1 Unit – Two Semesters

Biology – H3110
This course covers topics of chemistry of life, evolution of life, cell structure and function, cell reproduction, genetics and ecology.
Prerequisite: Both semesters of Earth/Environmental Science with a passing grade 
Credit: 1 Unit – Two Semesters

Chemistry – H3060
This course involves the study of the laws, concepts and principles governing the composition and changes of matter. Emphasis is placed on critical thinking skills, problem solving and laboratory activities.
Prerequisite: Both semesters of Algebra I with a “C” or higher
Credit: 1 Unit – Two Semesters

Physical Science – H3024
This course provides the student with a study of chemistry and physics topics. The class involves the study of the laws, concepts and principles governing the composition and changes of matter. This course will also provide the student with an understanding of the basic scientific principles of physics.
Prerequisite: Both semesters of Biology with a passing grade
Credit: 1 Unit – Two Semesters

Advanced Placement Physics – H3270W
AP Physics B is a national algebra/trigonometry based course in physics. The syllabus for this course is equivalent to introductory physics courses for university students. The emphasis is on understanding the concepts and skills using laboratory investigation and formulae to solve problems. Laboratory work is an integral part of this course. In this course students will investigate kinematics, Newton’s laws, torque, rotational motion and angular momentum, gravitation, circular motion, work, energy, power, linear momentum, mechanical waves and sound, and electric circuits. This course is designed for college bound students interested in pursuing a science related field. Dual credit may be available. Students will be qualified to sit for the AP Physics 1 examination.
Prerequisite: Students interested in taking AP Physics must have successfully completed high school geometry and be concurrently enrolled in Algebra II. Students should be able to read and comprehend college level text, take independent notes, follow multi-step procedures, and keep up with a rigorous level of coursework. Students should have a strong understanding of the following: Performing algebraic manipulations of mathematical equations; Trigonometry focusing on the use of sine, cosine and tangent;
Creating a graph using data and interpret said graph using tools such as slope and area,
Credit: 1 Unit – Two Semesters
Weighted: 1.0


Social Studies

The following course areas of social studies are required of the student in the fulfillment of the three units of social studies required for graduation:
One Unit of United States History Grades 9-12
One Unit of World Studies Grades 10-12
One Unit of American Government Grades 10-12

United States History: Reconstruction to the Modern Era – H1109
This introductory United States History course covers the periods of American history from Reconstruction to the Modern Era. U.S. History examines the ever-evolving relationships among the government, the people, and the economy, as well as analyzing the changing views of citizenship. The student in this course will also evaluate the role of the United States in globalization.
Prerequisite: None
Credit: 1 Unit – Two Semesters (United States History)

World History: 1450 – Present Day – H1100
World History is the analysis of global history since 1450 with an emphasis on historical inquiry, use of evidence and recognizing different perspectives. This World History course will examine changes throughout World History including governmental, cultural, economic, and geographical. This course is designed to give the student an overview and encourage them to think critically about the development of history as it relates to our present day cultures and situations while focusing on what it means to be a part of humanity.
Prerequisite: None
Credit: 1 Unit – Two Semesters (World Studies)

American Government – H1000
This course is devoted to the study of the federal government and the United States Constitution along with the Missouri state and local governments. Other relevant subjects include economics, geography, and current events. The student will be required to use various forms of technology and develop literacy that incorporates research and interpretation of documents, visuals, and oral recordings.
Prerequisite: None
Credit: 1 Unit – Two Semesters (American Government)

Advanced Placement Psychology – H1335W
The AP Psychology course is designed to introduce students to the systematic and scientific study of the behavior and mental processes of human beings and other animals. Students are exposed to the psychological facts, principles, and phenomena associated with each of the major subfields within psychology and learn about the ethical considerations and methods psychologists use in the science and practice. Students will gain an understanding of the strength and limitations of various psychological approaches and research methods. This course is designed to mirror an entry-level college course and students are expected to read and write extensively as well as evaluate and perform psychological experiments when applicable.
Prerequisite: Students who are successful in AP Psychology must be strong independent readers and organized writers.  Students must be motivated and able to complete college-level course work. Successful completion of a previous high school history course is required. Course content is not recommended for freshmen.
Credit: 1 Unit – Two Semesters (Independent Elective)
Weighted: 1.0

Advanced Placement United States Government and Politics – H1090W
AP United States Government and Politics introduces students to key political ideas, institutions, policies, interactions, roles, and behaviors that characterize the political culture of the United States. The course examines politically significant concepts and themes, through which students learn to apply disciplinary reasoning, assess causes, and consequences of political events, and interpret data to develop evidence-based arguments.
Prerequisite: Students who are successful in AP United States Government and Politics must be strong independent readers and organized writers.  Students must be motivated and able to complete college-level course work. Successful completion of a previous high school history course is required.
Credit: 1 Unit – Two Semesters (American Government)
Weighted: 1.0

Physical Education and Health

Health and Wellness – H8050 
The high school Health curriculum is designed to provide students with the knowledge and skills to make decisions which will affect their health and well-being. Topics covered in the course include Nutrition Principles and Practices, Life Management and Risk Avoidance Skills, Disease Prevention, First Aid and CPR, Substance Abuse, Personal Fitness and Wellness, and Sexual Health.
Prerequisite: None
Credit: ½ Unit – One Semester 

Physical Education
In this course, students will focus on health-related fitness as they set goals and develop a program to improve their fitness level through cardio, strength, and flexibility training. In addition, they will learn about biomechanics and movement concepts as they enhance their level of skill-related fitness. This course examines basic concepts in fitness that are important for personal fitness, as well as necessary foundational information for any health or exercise career field. Areas of study include musculoskeletal anatomy and physiology, terms of movement, basic biomechanics, health-related components of fitness, safety and injury prevention, posture and technique, nutrition, and weight management.
Prerequisite: None
Credit: ½ Unit – One Semester 

Personal Finance

Personal Finance – H5400
Understanding and managing personal finances are key to one's future financial success. Students will learn how choices influence occupational options and future earning potential, and will apply decision-making skills to evaluate career choices and set personal goals. The course content includes wise spending, saving, and credit decisions and effective use of income to achieve personal financial success. Students enrolled in Personal Finance are eligible to join a student business organization (FBLA).
Prerequisite: None
Open to: 10, 11, 12
Credit: ½ Unit – One Semester (Personal Finance requirement)
Career Path: Business Management and Technology

Electives

Art Appreciation 
Covering art appreciation and the beginning of art history, this course encourages students to gain an understanding and appreciation of art in their everyday lives. Presented in an engaging format, Intro to Art provides an overview of many introductory themes: the definition of art, the cultural purpose of art, visual elements of art, terminology and principles of design, and two- and three-dimensional media and techniques. Tracing the history of art, high school students enrolled in the course also explore the following time periods and places: prehistoric art, art in ancient civilizations, and world art before 1400.
Prerequisite: None
Credit:1/2 Unit – One Semester

Art History
Introducing art within historical, social, geographical, political, and religious contexts for understanding art and architecture through the ages, this course offers high school students an in-depth overview of art throughout history, with lessons organized by chronological and historical order and world regions. Students enrolled in this course cover topics including early medieval and Romanesque art; art in the twelfth, thirteenth, and fourteenth centuries; fifteenth-century art in Europe; sixteenth-century art in Italy; the master artists; High Renaissance and baroque art; world art, which includes the art of Asia, Africa, the Americas, and the Pacific cultures; eighteenth-and nineteenth-century art in Europe and the Americas; and modern art in Europe and the Americas
Prerequisite: None
Credit:1/2 Unit – One Semester

Fine Arts Appreciation: Art OVH7140
Students enrolled in this online course will be introduced to visual art ideas as they relate to the history and context in which art is made. Students will interact with art through the lens of a tourist, a critic and a curator through activities that include virtually visiting museums around the world, blogging, and curating a virtual exhibition.
Prerequisite: None
Credit: 1/2 Unit – One Semester

Fine Arts Appreciation: Music OVH7203
Students enrolled in this online course will be introduced to music of the 20th century and how it affected the culture of America. Units to be covered may include, but not be limited to Jazz, Rock n Roll, Motown, and Hip Hop.
Prerequisite: None
Credit: 1/2 Unit – One Semester

Economics - H1350
Economics is a course in which the student learns the basic economic concepts and principles behind personal choices, monetary exchanges and financial interactions. The course asks the student to critically analyze economic philosophy, prosperity and recession, national economic systems, and individual financial decisions. The student will have the opportunity to investigate economic situations that affect their personal lives via the Internet.
Prerequisite: None
Credit: 1/2 Unit – One Semester

French I – H6010
The student learns to communicate in basic spoken and written French using high-frequency vocabulary in everyday situations. Each lesson topic features an interest of French-speaking young people in the world today. The student experiences French culture through videos, role-playing and music. 
Prerequisite: English Language Arts with a “C” or higher and current English teacher approval
Credit: 1 Unit – Two Semesters

French II – H6020
The student actively engages in speaking, listening, reading and writing activities using more advanced grammar and vocabulary in a variety of common situations within a cultural setting. The student becomes sensitive to cultural differences through videos, role-playing and reading material from and about the French-speaking world. 
Prerequisite: French I with a “C” or higher
Credit: 1 Unit – Two Semesters

French III – H6030
In French III, students continue to develop skills in speaking, listening and writing French. At this level there is increased emphasis on vocabulary development, oral proficiency, expression in past and various other tenses. Students continue to expand knowledge of the culture of language-speaking peoples.
Prerequisite: French II with a “C” or higher
Credit: 1 Unit – Two Semesters

French IV – H6040
In French IV, students concentrate on more proficient communication in French. Students and teachers communicate more in French in order to refine the skills of speaking, auditory and reading comprehension, and composition. Students apply previously learned verb tenses and are introduced to the remaining tenses and moods in the verb system. Units of study include more authentic readings and discussion of culture and personal opinions.
Prerequisite: French III with a “C” or higher
Credit: 1 Unit – Two Semesters

Fundamentals of Programming and Software Development 
This semester-long course provides students with an understanding of basic software development concepts and practices, issues affecting the software industry, careers within the software industry, and the skills necessary to perform well in these occupations. Students learn details about core concepts in programming using Java, writing and debugging code, proper syntax, flow of control, order of operations, comparison operators, and program logic tools and models. Students learn the function of key program techniques including if statements, looping, and arrays, as well as web development using HTML and drag-and-drop development of user interfaces in an integrated development environment. Students explore the software development life cycle and different variations used to create software.
Prerequisite: None
Credit:1/2 Unit – One Semester

German I – H6110
The German I course will introduce the student to basic vocabulary and grammar, rudimentary communication with learned phrases and simple questions and answers in German. The student will acquire an understanding of the customs and traditions of German-speaking countries. 
Prerequisite: None
Credit: 1 Unit – Two Semesters

German II – H6120
The German II course will increase the student’s abilities in understanding, speaking, reading and writing the German language. The student is encouraged to use the German they have learned on a regular basis. Topics include food and dining, sports and free-time activities, clothing, jobs and their future. The student learns more about German culture through video, music and singing. 
Prerequisite: German I with a “C” or higher
Open to: 9, 10, 11, 12 
Credit: 1 Unit – Two Semesters

Introduction to Business
Curious about how business works? Want to know more about the relationship between consumers, workers, and citizens? Introduction to Business introduces students to how business works in today’s society. Students will explore aspects of the business world, including marketing, management and leadership, global economics, and finances. This course will prepare students for future courses in business and marketing. 
Prerequisite: None
Credit:1/2 Unit – One Semester

Introduction to Computer Science 
This full-year course is designed for students in grades 9–10, although any students across grades 9–12 may enroll. This course introduces students to the foundational concepts of computer science and challenges them to explore how computing and technology can affect the world. Students have creative, hands-on learning opportunities to create computer programs, develop web pages, design mobile apps, write algorithms, and collaborate with peers while building strong foundational knowledge. This course provides a solid foundation for more advanced study as well as practical skills that students can use immediately
Prerequisite: None
Credit: 1  Unit – One Year

Introduction to Psychology – H1320
This course offers an introduction to the scientific study of thoughts and behavior. Psychology is a unique course in which the student will learn to assess human behavior objectively. In Introduction to Psychology, the focus is on understanding how this subject can be used to make sense of people’s lives.
Prerequisite: None
Credit: ½ Unit – One Semester (Independent Elective)

Spanish I – H6210
Spanish I is an introduction to the Spanish language. The student develops the skills of understanding, speaking, reading and writing in Spanish, learning basic vocabulary and the fundamental structure of grammar. The student engages in a variety of activities which introduce them to the culture and customs of many Spanish-speaking countries. The diversity of Hispanic culture is also experienced through videos and music. Heavy emphasis is placed on oral communication. 
Prerequisite: English Language Arts with a “C” or higher and current English teacher approval
Open to: 9, 10, 11, 12
Credit: 1 Unit – Two Semesters 

Spanish II – H6220
In Spanish II, the student expands their vocabulary and builds on grammar skills previously acquired. Communication in Spanish is stressed with added emphasis on reading, writing and speaking skills. The student experiences a variety of activities including games, class presentations and creative writing activities. Hispanic culture is presented through music and videos. 
Prerequisite: Spanish I with a “C” or higher
Open to: 9, 10, 11, 12 
Credit: 1 Unit – Two Semesters

Spanish III – H6230
Spanish III Students in Spanish III continue to develop skills in speaking, listening, and writing Spanish. At this level there is increased emphasis on vocabulary development, oral proficiency, expression in the past tenses and various other tenses. Students continue to expand knowledge of the culture of Spanish-speaking peoples. 
Prerequisite: Spanish II with a “C” or higher
Credit: 1 Unit – Two Semesters

Sociology - H1340
The student in sociology studies people and their lives in a group. Sociology is concerned with how people behave in groups and how group interaction shapes their behavior. Topics include socialization from birth through adulthood, forms of communication, roles in society, cultural and social changes, the family, and problems facing society.
Prerequisite: None
Credit: ½ Unit – One Semester (Independent Elective)

Web Design I – H5080 
Web Design I introduces students to the fundamentals of developing and publishing effective business Web pages. Students design and create a website that is easy to navigate, visually appealing, and effectively communicates a purpose. The class will explore the use of computer animation, graphic and technical details, and design theory. Students enrolled in Web Design I are eligible to join a student business organization (FBLA).
Prerequisite: None
Credit: ½ Unit – One Semester (Practical Arts)

Web Design II – H5085 
Web Design II focuses on advanced techniques in web design with particular emphasis on design elements involving layout, navigation and business client/customer interaction. Students will complete hands on web design exercises using advanced aspects of current web design software. Students will create a fully functioning professional website. Students enrolled in Web Design II are eligible to join a student business organization (FBLA).
Prerequisite: Successful completion of Web Design I
Credit: ½ Unit – One Semester (Practical Arts)

Website by SchoolMessenger Presence. © 2020 Intrado Corporation. All rights reserved.